Benji starts bright in new code

Benji Marshall has made an encouraging start to his Super Rugby career, getting through 40 minutes for the Blues in his first game of rugby union in more than a decade.
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The former West Tigers and Kiwis rugby league star played the opening two quarters at five-eighth in the Blues’ 38-35 pre-season loss to the Hurricanes on Saturday in Masterton.There was no sign of nerves from Marshall, who distributed the ball well, made the odd run at the line and took on the responsibility of re-starts and kicking for touch.Marshall tried his trademark sidestep once – and met the considerable force of Hurricanes flanker Ardie Savea – but mostly, he was content sticking to basics and getting a feel for his new position.

‘‘I didn’t set the game on fire but, in terms of trying to get control and feel for playing 10, everything I wanted to get I got out of it,’’ said a happy Marshall.‘‘It wasn’t about being the best player on the field. It was just trying to get through what we practised and get a feel for the game.’’

Marshall didn’t shy away in defence, although he failed to hold on to Tim Bateman in the build-up to the Hurricanes’ third try. He even opted to get stuck into a couple of rucks, with mixed results.

Blues coach John Kirwan was pleased with Marshall’s first hitout and ruled out a switch to fullback.

‘‘I think (first-five) is his position,’’ said Kirwan. ‘‘He certainly put his hand up today so we’ll put him out there again next week and we’ll just keep working on him. It was a good start.’’

The match, in front of a sold-out crowd of 6000, was an entertaining one, which produced 11 tries – six for the Hurricanes and five for the Blues.

The Blues recovered from a 19-0 deficit to lead 21-19 at halftime, and 35-24 at three-quarter time, but more direct running from the Hurricanes in the final spell produced the rewards and lock James Broadhurst scored the winning try with eight minutes to go.

AAP

GALLERY: BDCA leading Addy vote-getters of the past six years

For the past six years, the Bendigo Adverter, with support from Bicknells Independent Sports, has held its BDCA Player of the Year Award.
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After every first XI game, the Addy sports department has awarded votes on a 5-4-3-2-1 basis.

Past winners have been

2008: Craig Howard (Strathdale)

2009: Craig Howard (Strathdale)

2010: Scott Johnson (Golden Square)

2011: Andrew Smith (Eaglehawk)

2012: Scott Johnson (Golden Square)

2013: Scott Johnson (Golden Square)

But over those six years, who have been the top-75 vote-getters.

Scroll through the gallery and find out.

1 – Scott Johnson (Golden Square) – 152 votes.

2 – Adam Burns (Kangaroo Flat) – 135 votes.

3 – Nick Crawford (Bendigo United) – 128 votes.

4 – Andrew Smith (Eaglehawk) – 126 votes.

5 – Craig Howard (Strathdale, Sandhurst this year) – 106 votes.

6 – Heath Behrens (Bendigo United) – 106 votes.

7 – Nick Scullie (Sandhurst) – 93 votes.

Ben Gunn (Strathfieldsaye, Bendigo United this year) – 87 votes.

9 – Ben DeAraugo (Strathdale) – 86 votes.

10 – Grant Connelly (Golden Square) – 86 votes.

11 – Mark Ryan (Bendigo) – 83 votes.

12 – Dom Taylor (Strathdale) – 81 votes.

13 – Gavin Bowles (White Hills) – 80 votes.

14 – Matt Fitt (Eaglehawk) – 78 votes.

15 – Linton Jacobs (Strathdale) – 75 votes.

16 – Andrew Hosking (Kangaroo Flat) – 74 votes.

17 – Cameron Taylor (Strathdale) – 71 votes.

18 – Jono Davison (Strathdale) – 68 votes.

19 – Hayden Polglase (Strathdale, Bendigo) – 64 votes.

20 – Jason Abbott (Eaglehawk) – 64 votes.

21 – Linc McRae (Eaglehawk, Huntly) – 64 votes.

22 – Marcus McKern (Golden Square, Bendigo) – 64 votes.

23 – Tim Robertson (Sandhurst, Kangaroo Flat) – 64 votes.

24 – Leigh McDermott (Bendigo United) – 62 votes.

25 – Anthony West (Sandhurst, Eaglehawk) – 61 votes.

26 – Phil Hetherington (Golden Square) – 61 votes.

27 – Aaron Monro (White Hills, Eaglehawk this year) – 60 votes.

28 – Tim Wood (Strathfieldsaye, Golden Square this year) – 60 votes.

29 – Miggy Podosky (Bendigo United) – 58 votes.

30 – Matt White (Eaglehawk) – 57 votes.

31 – Adam Hargreaves (White Hills, Strathfieldsaye) – 54 votes.

32 – Quinton Bentley (Golden Square, Sandhurst, Huntly this year) – 54 votes.

33 – Brodie McRae (White Hills, Huntly) – 53 votes.

34 – Ben Devanny (Strathfieldsaye) – 52 votes.

35 – Ryan Grundy (Huntly) – 51 votes.

36 – Greg Lyon (Strathfieldsaye) – 50 votes.

37 – Darren Gregory (White Hills) – 49 votes.

38 – Sam Johnston (Huntly) – 49 votes.

39 – Glenn Franzi (Bendigo) – 48 votes.

40 – Brad Orton (Kangaroo Flat) – 47 votes.

41 – Brent Hamblin (Kangaroo Flat) – 47 votes.

42 – Cory Jacobs (Eaglehawk) – 47 votes.

43 – Wayne Fidler (Bendigo United) – 46 votes.

44 – Dylan Gibson (Sandhurst, Huntly this year) – 45 votes.

45 – Brett Andrews (Bendigo) – 43 votes.

46 – Matt Pinniger (Bendigo United) – 43 votes.

47 – Tyrone Downie (White Hills) – 41 votes.

48 – Liam Smith (Strathfieldsaye) – 40 votes.

49 – Michael Hill (Bendigo) – 39 votes.

50 – Braden Hocking (Strathdale) – 38 votes.

51 – Darren Clutton (Golden Square) – 38 votes.

52 – Josh Collinson (Huntly) – 38 votes.

53 – Mark Di Fede (Bendigo United) – 38 votes.

54 – Tony Taig (Kangaroo Flat) – 38 votes.

55 – Marcus Smalley (Bendigo United) – 37 votes.

56 – Andrew Bourne (Eaglehawk, Sandhurst) – 36 votes.

57 – Mark Holland (Sandhurst) – 36 votes.

58 – Andrew Sheehan (Bendigo, Sandhurst) – 34 votes.

59 – Brett Elvey (Huntly) – 34 votes.

60 – Brad O’Shea (Strathdale, Golden Square) – 32 votes.

61 – Matthew Pask (Sandhurst) – 32 votes.

62 – Richard Tibbett (Eaglehawk) – 32 votes.

63 – Stephen Brown (Strathfieldsaye) – 32 votes.

64 – Tim Edwards (Strathdale, Bendigo) – 31 votes.

65 – Travis King (Strathdale) – 31 votes.

66 – Jason Johnson (Golden Square) – 30 votes.

67 – Daniel Larke (White Hills) – 29 votes.

68 – Darren Petersen (Bendigo) – 29 votes.

69 – Shane Taylor (Eaglehawk) – 29 votes.

70 – James Pietromonaco (Golden Square) – 28 votes.

71 – Justin Hargreaves (White Hills, Strathfieldsaye) – 28 votes.

72 – Andrew Chalkley (Strathdale) – 28 votes.

73 – Andrew Stove (Strathfieldsaye) – 26 votes.

74 – Brenton Jones (Sandhurst) – 26 votes.

75 – Chris Pinniger (Bendigo United) – 26 votes.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fatal crash closes Sturt Highway near Hay

SUNDAY 12.30pm:THE condition of a female involved in yesterday’s horror crash near Hay is improving.
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Initial reports indicated the passenger was taken to Hay Hospital with life-threatening injuries.

She has since been transferred to Griffith Base Hospital, where a spokeswoman said she remained in a stable condition.

Police are yet to provide any further information aboutthe crash and the ages of all involved remain unknown.

The Sturt Highway reopened shortly before 1am this morning.

The scene of a fatal crash between a car and truck on the Sturt Highway east of Hay. The accident, which occurred shortly before 5pm on Saturday forced the closure of the highway. Picture: Daisy Huntly

The scene of a fatal crash between a car and truck on the Sturt Highway east of Hay. The accident, which occurred shortly before 5pm on Saturday forced the closure of the highway. Picture: Daisy Huntly

The scene of a fatal crash between a car and truck on the Sturt Highway east of Hay. The accident, which occurred shortly before 5pm on Saturday forced the closure of the highway. Picture: Daisy Huntly

The crash scene near Hay. Pic: Daisy Huntly

The crash scene near Hay. Pic: Daisy Huntly

The crash scene near Hay. Pic: Daisy Huntly

SATURDAY 9pm:A FEMALE is deadand another is fighting for their life after a car and truck collided near Hay this afternoon.

Emergency services were called to the crash on the Sturt Highway, about 10km east of Hay, just before 5pm.

A female passenger of the sedan died at the scene.

Another female passenger was taken to Hay Hospital with life-threatening injuries, while the male driver suffered minor injuries.

Their ages are not yet known.

The truck driver was not injured but taken to hospital to undergo mandatory blood and urine testing.

Police from Deniliquin Local Area Command have launched an investigation into the crash and are appealing for any witnesses to come forward.

The highway is still closed in both directions.

SATURDAY 5.30pm:The Sturt Highway is closed in both directions 10km east of Hay due to a serious car and truck accident.

Westbound motorists can detour via Murrumbidgee River Road, then take the Mid Western Highway to Hay to then rejoin the Sturt Highway.

Eastbound motorists are advised to use the Mid Western Highway to Goolgowi, then take the Kidman Way to Griffith to then rejoin the Sturt Highway.

Emergency services are on site working to clear the accident and reopen the highway.

There is no forecast at this stage as to when the highway will be reopened.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Who is the Labor candidate, asks Jay Weatherill

IN an embarrassing moment for embattledSouth Australian Premier Jay Weatherill, the Labor leader admitted while in in Crystal Brook on Saturdayhedidn’t know who the local Labor candidate was for theMarch 15 state election.
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The seat, seen as crucial for Labor to retain office, is to becontested by candidate Marcus Connelly, the nephew of a late former Speaker inthe Don Dunstan era.

MrWeatherillwas visiting a command station for the Country FireService atCrystal Brook,near Port Pirie, when hewasasked by Fairfax Media aboutMrConnelly’s absence.

He replied: “Who isMarcus Connelly?”

After being told he was the local candidate MrWeatherillcontinuedthat hewas on a “flying visit so we’re justpopping in here”.

He praised the dedication and skill of firefighters involvedin the marathon Bangor blaze then inspected the incident control room.

When he emerged the said to the Premierhe was surprised he didn’tknow who the candidate was. MrWeatherillsmiled and said “yes”.

He said Mr Connelly was probably not available and reiterated thathe was “just coming through this big area”.

Later, talking to another reporter, MrWeatherillmentioned that theLabor Party was seeking to promote “our Labor Partycandidate” but did not mention Mr Connelly by name.

Earlier, when contacted by Fairfax Media, Mr Connelly said he wasunaware of the Premier’s visit.

This incident comes barely 24 hours after Mr Weatherill said he was prepared to do “whatever it takes” to present a unified government ahead of the March 15 state election.

The newly-created ‘faceless man’ in Port Pirie politics, Marcus Connelly said he was ‘disappointed’ that the Premier had not known who he was.

“I can understand that he is extremely busy and that there are a lot of new candidates, but that is disappointing,” he said.

“He has probably only met me once.

“Coming through my region, he should have some idea who the Labor candidate is.

South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill.

“I had a phone call about it later in the day. To be fair to them, there was a courtesy phone call.”

Labor candidate Marcus Connelly

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

When a passion for work careers into an addiction

For some people work never stops, even if they aren’t physically there. They are workaholics, the people who are mentally at work 24/7, for whom work eclipses everyone and everything else in their lives.
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Kate* sensed she was heading for a personal train wreck. Having landed her dream job in international education administration, she was working around the clock to meet targets, sometimes for three weeks at a stretch without a day off.

“It consumed me,” Kate admits. “I couldn’t stop thinking about work. I’d go to sleep worrying about work, I’d dream about work and I’d wake up thinking about it. Even when I had free time I wasn’t able to be present and available with family and friends. “

Suffering constant headaches and irritable bowel syndrome, the 30-year-old was too exhausted from work to do anything when she did get time off.

Yet still Kate couldn’t help herself. “One time I burst into tears to my partner. I said ‘I’m not a machine. I’m treating myself like a machine.’ He said ‘You need to stop.’ I said ‘I can’t stop. I just need to get over this deadline and then we’ll see’.”

The term workaholism was coined half a century ago by American psychologist Wayne Oates. He defined a workaholic as “a person whose need for work has become so excessive that it creates a noticeable disturbance or interference with his bodily health, personal happiness and interpersonal relations, and with his smooth social functioning.”

Australia is often outed for being a nation of workaholics that belies its laidback image. We’re second only to the Japanese in hoarding annual leave: just half of us take all our holidays compared with a third of workers in Japan according to an international IPSOS poll.

The most recent Australian Work and Life Index found we have higher rates of work intensity than Europeans. Two-fifths of working Australians report that they are working at very high speeds and to tight deadlines three-quarters of their working time: a third believe they have too much work to do for one person.

Yet many workaholics talk about the buzz they get from working – the adrenalin rush of being under intense pressure and having to meet deadlines. Between 8 and 25 per cent of workers identify as workaholics, according to a study recently published in the US Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

But whereas society takes a dim view of the high alcoholics get from drinking, or gamblers get from a punt, workaholism has been called the “respectable addiction”.

“It’s such a rewarded problem,” points out 65- year-old Sydney academic Veronica* who has battled workaholism her entire working life and attends Workaholics Anonymous. “You get prestige, you get money, you get all these strokes for being a workaholic. It’s very hard to see how it can damage yourself and your relationships.”

For every workaholic who craves the sense of achievement work delivers, there is a workaholic driven by insecurity and perfectionism, warns organisational psychologist Leanne Faraday-Brash. “It’s not about getting a reward for effort,” she says. “It’s about trying to stave off fear and anxiety.”

At the extreme end of the workaholism spectrum is what the Japanese call karoshi, or death by overwork. In December 27-year-old advertising copywriter Pradnya Paramita died after tweeting she had worked 30 hours straight at the Jakarta office of Young & Rubicam. In August 21-year-old Merrill Lynch intern Moritz Erhardt died of an epileptic seizure in the shower of his London flat after working 72 hours non-stop.

Not all workaholics are corporate high-flyers. WA members include builders, housewives and even an out-of-work busker. They’re plagued by to-do lists, feel lots of people depend on them, and get caught up in the process of working rather than delivering a finished product.

Researching his bookChanging GearsGreg Foyster attended a Workaholics Anonymous meeting in Melbourne and quickly realised he strongly identified with the stories being shared.

“It was a bit of a shock to me,” the 30-year-old recalls. “Everyone had this intense focus on their work; they scheduled all their time, even their days off. They suffered paralysing perfectionism – they couldn’t leave things half-finished but they tried to do too much in a day so they were never going to achieve it all.”

It was all too familiar to Foyster who used to define himself by his advertising career. He was always taking work home, constantly getting sick, and when he wasn’t spending all his waking hours on advertising work, would be reading philosophy as part of his quest for self-improvement.

“I had this philosophy that if you didn’t spend 13 hours a day working or improving yourself in some way, it was time wasted,” Foyster says. “If you’ve worked for a couple of years in a high-stress job working long hours you just get used to that mode of being.” “

Foyster’s girlfriend Sophie finally forced him to abandon the rat race for a simpler life. “I’ve got more out of my relationship than I ever would in any job,” he says.

Workaholics frequently report growing up with absent fathers who worked long hours. Foyster’s own father had a heart attack at 42, which Foyster attributes to stress and overwork.

He vividly remembers his dad catching him lying on his bed reading in year 12. “He said ‘ Why aren’t you working Greg? This is a time of stress’,” Foyster recounts. “I learnt from my dad that work equals stress.”

Veronica attributes her workaholism to growing up with an alcoholic mother. “I felt rather isolated emotionally,” she recalls. “When you’re used to relying on yourself [as a child] you do that in the workplace as an adult. You find it very difficult to ask for support, and you have unrealistic expectations of what you can do.”

Workaholics Anonymous branches exist in cities around the world but workaholism is not officially listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as an addiction. It is instead considered a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder. There is debate about whether workaholism is simply pathologising the normal behaviour of working hard.

Faraday-Brash argues that while hard workers “will walk over broken glass to get the job done”, they are able to switch off when they are not at work. This is impossible for workaholics.

“They take work to bed, they find it hard to disengage on holidays; when they’re away from work they’re fretting that they’re not getting stuff done,” Faraday-Brash says. “They start shutting down their feelings altogether. They lose compassion and empathy for other people because it is all about getting the job done.”

The damage workaholism does to personal relationships can reinforce the behaviour. “When they’re very busy at work they neglect other people. Then they go home and get grief which reinforces the idea that work is a bit of a haven from personal conflicts,” Faraday-Brash says.

Veronica believes her workaholism cost her one long-term relationship, and has affected her ability to develop deeper friendships. “If you have any personal issues you can easily hide from them in your work,” she says.

“Among my friends I was known as someone who was always late, ‘you can’t rely on her’. It would make my flesh creep, I would squirm, I felt terrible shame.”

Veronica has a number of chronic illnesses she attributes to her workaholism, including gastric reflux, insomnia and anxiety, as well as an eating disorder.

Workaholics are more likely to have alcohol problems, get dementia, suffer heart disease, gastro-intestinal problems and diabetes. One study found a third of people being treated for sex addiction were workaholics.

The train wreck education administrator Kate feared never eventuated. She was made redundant and the deadline which had dominated her life disappeared. “Circumstances probably did for me what I wouldn’t have felt confident doing myself,” says Kate, who goes to Workaholics Anonymous weekly.

But while people like Kate and Veronica are trying to shed their workaholism, others embrace it.

Unashamed workaholics who contacted Extra all reported working long hours including weekends, found it impossible to switch off from work and copped grief from family and friends for always working. They claim such commitment is necessary to succeed in their careers, and insist they actually enjoy being in a workaholic state.

“I absolutely love what I’m doing,” internet entrepreneur Ruslan Kogan says. “So when people say to me ‘how many hours a week do you work?’ I tell them I don’t work any hours a week – I live this stuff.”

It’s a sentiment echoed by Anna Hopkins, who runs her own cafe Whole Meal in Darlinghurst and is developing a range of protein products. “Society calls me a workaholic, but I love what I do so I don’t consider it work,” the 32-year-old says. “You do what you do so you get the results you want. Steve Jobs didn’t talk about work/life balance when he was inventing the iPhone.”

For recovering workaholics like Kate and Veronica the risk of crossing the line into unhealthy working always lurks. They are learning to set acceptable work boundaries, let go of unrealistic expectations, prioritise tasks and enjoy recreation.

“I’m learning at WA to value myself as a human being, regardless of whether I’m working, regardless of what I do for work, regardless of what position title I have,” says Kate.

*Names have been changed to protect anonymity.

BREAK THE TREADMILL

If you answer ”often” or ”always” to at least four of the following, you may be a workaholic:

• You think of how you can free up more time to work.

• You spend much more time working than initially intended.

• You work to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, helplessness and depression.

• You won’t listen when told by others to cut down on work.

• You become stressed if you are prohibited from working.

• You deprioritise hobbies, leisure activities and exercise because of your work.

• You work so much that it has negatively influenced your health.

Steps to cure workaholism:

• Gradually reduce work hours.

• Plan time for recreation.

• Exercise every day.

• Avoid talking shop over lunch.

• Carefully select leisure activities.

• Refuse to feel guilty when you are not working.

Workaholics deprioritise hobbies, leisure activities and exercise. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Gallery: TMCA annual get-together

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler
Nanjing Night Net

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

Hundreds gathered for the annual Tasmanian Mountain Cattlemen’s Association get-together, held at The Rough Paddock at Penstock in the Central Highlands. Picture: Paul Scambler

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Unliveable Redfern cottage sells for $1 million

The three-bedroom weatherboard has been left empty for half a decade. Photo: Supplied 48 Chelsea Street, Redfern: broken floorboards, rising damp and termite damage. Photo: Supplied
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Despite having broken floorboards, rising damp and termite damage,  a rundown, unliveable Redfern cottage has sold for $1,025,000 –  $75,000 above reserve.

And buyer Tai Phan, a 34-year-old lawyer from Bondi, immediately suffered buyer remorse. ‘‘What have I done?’’ he joked. ‘‘Now that I look back at it, [I have] a bit of remorse.’’

The three-bedroom weatherboard on a tiny 107 square metres of land at 48 Chelsea Street had been left empty for half a decade and was being sold by the Public Trustee. It was built in 1910 by a Redfern bootmaker named William Steward and last traded in 1956 for £435.

The auction attracted about 200 people, 13 of whom had registered to bid. When bidding passed the $1 million mark, one neighbour in the crowd remarked, ‘‘This is ridiculous.’’

They may have been familiar with the sale of the equally dishevelled property directly behind the house, which sold for $650,000 in 2012.

But Mr Phan said the market had changed considerably in the past 12 months. ‘‘It is pretty crazy, hey?’’ he said. ‘‘Just before summer it really kicked off and people went a little bit nuts, but I’ve found something now so I’m pretty happy. I didn’t expect to pay that much, but it is what it is.’’

According to the senior economist at Australian Property Monitors, Dr Andrew Wilson, the Redfern median house price has just surpassed $1 million for the first time.

“I’ve re-run the numbers and the median price for Redfern is $1.01 million,” he said.

“Redfern is now one of those million dollar suburbs of Sydney, with a top price last year of $2.45 million.”

The house in Chelsea Street is Mr Phan’s third property purchase; he plans to renovate with his builder brother Tom and lease it out. The rental return, Tom joked, would depend on ‘‘how many bunk beds we can fit in there’’. The pair estimate it will cost about $150,000 to make it liveable, which would include replacing the floorboards and adding a fourth bedroom in the attic.

Selling agent Warren Gibson from Century 21 Parkins Gibson said more than 100 groups had toured the property before the auction.

Many Sydney properties blitzed their reserves on the first Saturday of the 2014 auction season.

Another deceased estate, at 5 Chiswick Street, Strathfield South, also drew in a huge numbers, with many in the 100-strong crowd gobsmacked to see the rundown two-bedroom home sell for $932,000.

‘‘It was in pretty bad condition,’’ selling agent Joe Campisi from Devine Real Estate said.

Across Sydney there were 93 properties scheduled for auction on Saturday, 21 more than the same weekend last year.  Sydney recorded a preliminary clearance rate of 80.3 per cent on the day, in line with the strong results that characterised the city’s market late last year. There are 1467 properties already scheduled for auction this month – 43 per cent more than the 1026 last February.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Versatility put to test

SKILL in runs, jumps and throws was put to the test at the weekend’s Little Athletics Victoria multi-event championships in Bendigo.
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The hot form of many girls and boys from across the state was matched by the scorching heat.

Misting sprays, a sprinkler at the finish line of the distance runs, a water slide and shortened program were all ways of trying to minimise the impact of the heat.

Little Athletics Victoria CEO Dean Paulin said despite the heat, the two-day titles at the Latrobe University Bendigo athletics complex in Flora Hillwere a great success.

“We had various policies in place because of the extreme heat,” Paulin said.

“Attempts at throws and jumps for under-9s to under-14s were two instead of three.

“We were to take a break on Saturday afternoon, but the competitors were keen to keep going.Saturday night’s program started at 5.30.

“The support from athletes, officials and parents was absolutely fantastic.”

The titles were a five-discipline contest for under-9 to under-13, and seven events for under-14 to under-16.

Paulin said a packed calendar for Athletics Australia,Athletics Victoria, LAV and schools meant the multi-event titles could not be re-scheduled to next weekend or the week after.

LEAP: Kate Wilcock in action in the under-11 long jump. Pictures: PETER WEAVING

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All eyes on South Sydney

Development sites across South Sydney are the hottest tickets in town with Asian-based and local developers prepared to pay up to garner a site.
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The limited supply of large development sites in the sought-after area, and general undersupply of housing in the wider Sydney market, are two of the key drivers of demand into 2014.

New Savills research on the sector notes that prime industrial net rents as at December 2013 in South Sydney ranged from $130 a square metre to $190 sqm; secondary buildings ranged from $90 sqm to $115 sqm.

The research says compared with the 12 months prior the figures are stable. This indicated that developers would look at the land for conversion to housing to generate higher end values.

According to Jones Lang LaSalle’s head of metropolitan sales and investments, NSW, Sam Brewer, demand in South Sydney was getting stronger as supply tightened and off-the-plan unit sales continued to be strong.

”We are seeing far more developers looking at purchasing larger development sites in South Sydney, of say 200-plus units, than there were a year ago, highlighting the increased demand for the area,” Mr Brewer said. He confirmed that Asian investors and developers were the keenest of the buyers.

Jones Lang LaSalle’s senior negotiator, metropolitan sales and investments, Scott Timbrell, said there was a consensus that there was an undersupply of housing in Sydney.

A large residential development site in South Sydney is being offered to the market by Mr Brewer and Mr Timbrell of Jones Lang LaSalle on behalf of Goodrich Control Systems Pty Ltd. The 10,300 sqm development site, at 84-92 Epsom Road, Zetland, is part of the redevelopment area of the $8-billion Green Square precinct. The property is within 4.8 kilometres of the Sydney CBD, 5km from the Sydney Airport, with all main public transport within walking distance.

The site is rectangular and represents an outstanding opportunity to acquire a large residential development site in the new Green Square Town Centre.

”Land values have slightly increased over the last 12 months,” says Savills research. ”A fall in debt finance and the lack of available stock has resulted in a return of ”cashed up” owner-occupiers to the market.

”Owner-occupiers are willing to pay solid prices for land to develop their premises in their desired location. These rates fall anywhere between $250-$350 per square metre.”

Savills anticipates owner occupiers will continue to seek 1 to 2 hectare sites, which should see a further lift in land values.

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Pub sales toast to bounteous year

A new round of sales and potential new floats will dominate the pub sector in the coming year, with more than $50 million having changed hands in the past two months.
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Private investor Anthony Medich paid $6 million for the Centennial Hotel at 88 Oxford Street, Woollahra, from Cos Psaltis, and it is expected there will be a newly launched restaurant joint-venture at the pub with celebrity chef Justin North.

Two of the biggest sales this year, yet to be finalised, were by Coles of The Palms at Chullora for $22.5 million to Iris Capital and the Long Jetty at Wyong to private investor Peter McDougal for $4.9 million.

In November, Coles put the assets on the market as part of its continued non-core pub divestment.

The potential float of the Australian Pub Fund is still to be finalised.

The sales come as the NSW pub sector works through the new late-night closing regulations introduced by NSW Premier Barry O’Farrell. Pub investors say most hotels will be immune, because most have midnight closing times. Only those with 3am closings will be affected.

Other recent sales by Jones Lang LaSalle Hotels pub investment sales director John Musca and associate Sam Handy include the Lansdowne Hotel, Chippendale, for $6.2 million to the owner of the Oscars Hotels chain, and Triple 888 Hotel, Chinatown, for $10 million to a private chinese investor.

Late last year the Jacksons on George Hotel in the city was bought for $23 million by developer Lend Lease, while the Lantern Hotel Group bought the Crown Hotel, Surry Hills for $15.5 million.

Mr Musca said he was not surprised to see a rush of hotel transaction activity in the last half of 2013 as recognition of the differential between hotel earnings and the cash rate inevitably transcended market investment malaise.

“The movement of the equity markets towards yield will preface interest in larger suburban hotels, where earnings histories are transparent, barriers to entry highest and growth manifestly evident,” he said.

Andrew Jolliffe, managing director of Ray White Hotels Australia, said he had spoken to a number of major lenders during the past week and all were pragmatic about the likely impacts of the proposed legislative amendments.

“Fundamentally, hotels are well positioned businesses with both loan-to-value ratios and interest cover ratios in better than good working order,” he said.

“Few industries are as resilient as the hotel industry.”

Mr Jolliffe sold the Plumpton Hotel for about $20 million last year and the Ray White Hotels Darwin office recently sold two hotel assets, with Woolworths hotel arm Australian Leisure and Hospitality rumoured to be the buyer.

“Darwin and the Northern Territory are emerging markets and hence key strategic objectives for our national business,” Mr Jolliffe said.

A new deal on the market is the Carrington Hotel at 563 Bourke Street, in Surry Hills, being sold by the private group of investor Greg Magree, Drink’n’Dine.

The inner-city venue forms part of Drink’n’Dine’s pub portfolio, which includes the renowned Forresters and Norfolk hotels.

Dan Dragicevich and Joel Fisher, of CBRE Hotels, who have been appointed to sell the venue, said the sale was in line with Drink’n’Dine’s expansion strategy.

“Having entered the industry initially with the 2009 purchase of the Norfolk Hotel, Drink’n’Dine has expanded rapidly, adding to its stable of five venues with the recent reopening of the Oxford Hotel in Petersham,” Mr Dragicevich said.

The sale marked the first time Drink’n’Dine had sold one of its venues, and the divestment would free the group up for further expansion.

Drink’n’Dine co-founder Jaime Wirth said the decision to sell was bittersweet. “It’s difficult parting with any of our venues, but we have decided that streamlining the group is best for the immediate future.”

Mr Fisher said the sale came after a watershed year in 2013 for the pub market, where yields had sharpened considerably and sales activity had continued to grow.

“There is a resounding appetite from current players, as well as new entrants for quality metro assets. This can be directly attributed to continued low rates and a lack of stock available,” he said.

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